Watch Six On History Channel But Watch Out For The Negative Money Message

Love the show, Six, on The History Channel.

Hate the money message, though.

After seeing actor, Walton Goggins play Boyd Crowder on “Justified,” I’ll watch him anytime anywhere. That means I am watching — “Six” a mini-series based on Seal Team Six.

My take: entertaining show. I love the positive theme “Never leave a brother behind.”

It’s the underlying money message that really bothers me.

Let me explain:

At Ricky “Buddha” Ortiz’s daughter’s quinceanera, it comes to the attention of his SEAL team members, Buddha hasn’t told the guys he is leaving. Read: daughter needs special dance academy and government salary low so he has to take a job with private industry. Buddha’s going to an international security firm that pays top dollar.

When he tells the guys, his mates see Buddha’s move to corporate America as a “sell out.”

The money message here is ridiculous.

A career move from Navy Seal to a corporate security firm is far from selling out, it’s a fantastic lifetime career strategy. To become a Navy SEAL means you are part of an elite group. You have skills very few people in the world possess which absolutely should be rewarded financially.

Similar to a mechanical engineering degree, graduating top in your class at Duke Law School or specializing in underwater welding, Navy SEAL skills are highly marketable — as they should be.

The US intelligence community recruits the ranks of the SEALS. In fact, former Navy SEAL and 3 Star Admiral Robert Harwood was just offered the job of National Security Advisor in the Trump administration. He turned it down as he serves as an executive with Lockheed Martin.

Clearly a career path that starts with Navy SEALs, ends with “write your own ticket.”

The premise that a SEAL who goes to work at a corporation is selling out is preposterous. The move is a smart career strategy. Corporate executives and corporate interests need protection. Executives in industries such as energy and mining could be kidnaped and held for ransom in countries they do business with around the world.

By the way, many Americans have a vested interest in the success of such companies. We may own them in our 401(k)s (if they are publicly traded.) Look at the annual reports of the mutual funds you own in your retirement plans, the companies held at the time of report are all listed. For example, if you own an S&P 500 index fund, you own global companies such as Caterpillar, Marriott Hotels, and Ryder Systems.

Working in a high level position for any multi-nationals corporation, is far from a sell out.

That said, go ahead and enjoy the show. Just be sure to ignore the negative money messages that appear to say, “Corporations = bad” and “Strategic career moves that involve lucrative compensation packages = sell out”

Neither is true.

Making such a move is not necessarily “leaving a brother behind.”

In fact, a smart career move could simply be moving on to a new band of brothers (and sisters.)

Smart Shoppers Guide: Look Fabulous For Less Money

I used to be excited when I bought something on sale. The “deal” was my indication of success. In hind sight, I wasted a lot of money with this mindset. Price is only one part of the equation.

A better way to think about your purchases is to determine the cost per use.

For example, when I changed jobs 3 years ago, I needed a lap top bag for client appointments. Professional looking was a must and something sturdy was vital. I decided on a black Michael Kors tote so it could double as a purse. I’ve used it just about every day for three years now and it looks brand new. I anticipate it will last at least another two years.

That tote was a great purchase. It was about $250.00 at the Michael Kors factory outlet store (not on sale.) Since the purse is a classic style, made to last many seasons and goes with everything I own, it was a winner.

Let’s look at the cost per use of my designer laptop bag purchase. I’ll use it 5 days a week for 50 weeks out of the year (since I love it so much, it’s always by my side.) The tote is intended to last 5 years – after 3, it still looks brand new.

The break down:

5 days a week x 50 weeks = 250 days a year
x 5 years = 1,250 uses

$250/1,250 = $0.20

Cost per use for designer laptop tote/purse = 20 cents per use

Let’s compare my purchase to a less expensive tote that would last one season because it wouldn’t hold up to constant use or we’d get tired of it because it wasn’t fabulous.

Nice lap top tote bag for $78. This bag is anticipated to last one season.

Let’s check out the cost per use.

5 days a week x 50 weeks = 250 days per year
x 1 year = 250 uses

$78/250 = $0.24 per use

Rounded up, it costs about 25 cents a use for the bag for one year. It costs slightly more per use than the fancy bag.

So what would you rather have though, something you really love that’s special or something basic you’d need to replace each year?

I vote for fabulous.

If you take really good care of your things, and have the funds to make the initial investment in a higher quality item, you could end up either paying less in the long run or having something nicer (or both.)

Remember: The longer you keep your stuff and the more you use it, the better the cost per use — in every single case.

I still love my bag and even use it on the weekends. What about you? What was your absolute best clothing or accessory purchase? Please tell!

Check out my Tightwad Tuesday Episode 10 video on how to determine if your purchase could be considered an expense or an investment.